Key Research

Associations Between Infant Screen Use, Electroencephalography Markers, and Cognitive Outcomes

Key Takeaways:

  • An association between screen use and negative cognitive outcomes was seen in this study.
  • Executive functions seem to be most affected
  • No screens for children under 18 months except for occasional video calls
  • Further efforts are needed to distinguish the direct association of infant screen use compared with family factors that predispose early screen use on executive function impairments

 

LiveMore ScreenLess’ Summary

Research evidence is mounting for the association between infant screen use and negative cognitive outcomes related to attention and executive functions. Evidence found  that electrocortical activity in specific brain regions mediated (which means to bring about) the association between infant screen use and later executive function impairments. These executive functions include self-regulation, learning, and academic achievement, and mental health.

The measurements of this study included parent-reported screen time at age 12 months of age; a power spectral density from EEG readings was collected at age 18 months; and finally child attention and executive functions were measured with teacher-reported questionnaires and objective laboratory-based tasks at age 9 years. The average daily screen time at the beginning of this study was 2.01 (1.86) hours for 12 month olds.

Law EC, Han MX, Lai Z, et al. Associations Between Infant Screen Use, Electroencephalography Markers, and Cognitive Outcomes. JAMA Pediatr. Published online January 30, 2023. 

Topics: Cognitive Development , Infancy & Early Childhood , Psychological Wellbeing

Year: 2023

Participants: 437 children

Data Collection: longitudinal, three times from 12 months to 9 years old